Former school resource officer dies in tragic hiking accident

Back to Article
Back to Article

Former school resource officer dies in tragic hiking accident

Photo provided by: Dailymail.co.uk

Photo provided by: Dailymail.co.uk

Photo provided by: Dailymail.co.uk

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Former Cam High resource officer Sergeant Steve Arthur and his wife Linda Arthur passed away while hiking in Keyhole Canyon at Zion National Park on Sep. 14, 2015.

Their deaths resulted from a series of sudden flash floods that raised the water levels of the trail’s narrow passageway. Arthur was 58.

National PArk 7 hikers standing before Keyhole Canyon on the day of its flooding. From left to right: Gary Favela, Don Teichner, Muku Reynolds, Steve Arthur, Linda Arthur, Robin Brum, and Mark MacKenzie.

Photo provided by: ktuv.com
National Park
Seven hikers standing before Keyhole Canyon on the day of its flooding.
From left to right: Gary Favela, Don Teichner, Muku Reynolds, Steve Arthur, Linda Arthur, Robin Brum, and Mark MacKenzie.

Many teachers and staff were close to Arthur, including Ms. Donna Maygren. “As a mother, how do you say thank you to someone who has touched your children’s lives? […] He always came to my class as a speaker,” she said.

“I first got to know him through his kids,” said Coach Ronald Wilson. “He was just a great human being, he cared about people and was very helpful to anybody.”

Steve Arthur, sergeant and 21-year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff's Department

Photo provided by: ktla.com
Steve Arthur, sergeant and 21-year veteran of the Ventura County Sheriff’s Department

According to Tim Acbell in the Tragedy in Zion article of the Camarillo Acorn newspaper, Arthur and his wife were seemingly always together. “There was a glue between them. You couldn’t separate them,” Acbell wrote.

Arthur loved being outdoors, hiking with his wife, and being surrounded by nature.

In the office, Arthur was well-liked by everyone, said John Franchi to the Acorn. “The sergeants here at the station have a really strong bond with each other, and Steve was a big part of that,” he said.

“He embraced everything that was good, wholesome, and right,” said Maygren. “He always reflected positively, looking for things to make him better.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email